Australian Visas for Chinese: Student, Working Holiday, Film, Business Owner & Investor Visas

Australia’s third largest export is education of international students, with Chinese students now being the largest number of foreign students in the country.
The Great Wall of China. China is the Homeland of Many Tourists and Students to Australia

China and Australia History

Australia has a long and prosperous relationship with China. The first Chinese visitors to Australia are believed to have been in the mid-18th century. A 2014 media report revealed that an “expedition to a remote island off the coast of the Northern Territory…unearthed an 18th-century Qing dynasty coin. ‘It certainly shows the contact between Northern Australia and the trade with the Middle Kingdom, with China,’ Mike Owen, a member of the expedition, told Australia’s ABC television network.”

Europeans first settled Australia at Sydney Cove in 1788. Melbourne, the capital of the later established colony of Victoria, was created in 1835. The Victorian Gold Rush of the 1850s resulted in a large influx of Chinese to Australia. By 1861 there were 40,000 Chinese in Australia, making up 3.3. % of Australia’s total population and 7 % of Victoria’s.

The Museum of Victoria reports that in 2011 there were almost 94,000 “China-born people in Victoria. In recent years many professionals have migrated from China, including scholars, doctors and business investors. Many more live in Victoria temporarily as students.”

In 2011 there were almost 94,000 China-born people in Victoria.
Australia and its States, Including Victoria

According to the 2016 census, Australians claiming Chinese descent make up 5.6 per cent of the country’s population, a total of more than 1.2 million people. After migrants from England and New Zealand, Chinese are the largest group of foreign-born Australians. One indication of the impact of Chinese in Australia today is that the country’s 2018 Miss Universe contestant, Francesca Hung, was of Chinese descent.

Overtaking New Zealanders, Chinese citizens have become the most numerous foreign visitors to Australia. In the year ending February 2018, 1.39 million Chinese visited Australia.

In 2017, China was Australia’s biggest trading partner, receiving US$68 billion in Australia products and services. (Almost 30 % of Australia’s total exports.)

Chinese Students in Australia

Australia’s third largest export is education of international students, with Chinese students now being the largest number of foreign students in the country.

In early 2018, the Australian newspaper reports, there were “173,000 Chinese students enrolled in Australian universities, colleges and schools
Chinese Students Are Now the Largest Number of Foreign Students in Australia

In early 2018, the Australian newspaper reports, there were “173,000 Chinese students enrolled in Australian universities, colleges and schools in the first two months of 2018, 18 per cent more than in the same period last year.”

Read more about the Australian 500 and 485 Student visas.

Chinese and Australia’s Working Holiday Visas

One way for young Chinese to work and live in Australia is via a Working Holiday visa. Citizens of China are eligible to apply for the 462 Working Holiday visa, while Hong Kong and Taiwan citizens are eligible to apply for the 417 Working Holiday visa.

Applicants for the 462 and 417 Working Holiday visas must be between the ages of 18 and 31. Read about other conditions for Australia’s Work and Holiday visas and the opportunities holders of these visas have to live and work in Australia for up to two years.

Australia’s Entertainment Visa for Chinese

Migration Ways has a trusted relationship with Chinese film and television producers. Migration Ways was, for example, the Australian migration agency that secured the visas for the talent and crew of Jackie Chan’s feature film Bleeding Steel and for the film Dogfight. Migration Ways also secured the visas for the Chinese television series Whistleblower, Old Boy and Butterflies Across the Sea.

 Migration Ways has a trusted relationship with Chinese film and television producers
Chinese Film and Television Productions Film in Australia

Consider this testimonial about our visa service from Bleeding Steel producer Paul Currie.

Your ability to wrangle all of the Chinese applicants information, including the high profile cast and crew and then make the process as streamlined and predictable as possible for the large numbers of visas required, was greatly appreciated not only by me but also by the Chinese producers as well. Paul Currie, Co-founder and director of Lightstream Pictures, Australia

And consider this testimonial from Hong Kong producer Johnny Wang.

I would highly recommend their services to any production with visa requirements and commend them on their sound, expert advice. Johnny Wang, Line Producer/Production Manager at October Pictures Company

Read about Australia’s 408 Entertainment visa.

Chinese citizens may also be interested in the Significant Investor aspect of the 188 visa
One Visa for Chinese Nationals is the Business Innovation and Investment 188 Visa
Chinese and Australia’s 188 Visa

Another possible visa for Chinese nationals is the Business Innovation and Investment 188 visa. Chinese citizens may also be interested in the Significant Investor aspect of the 188 visa.

There are many visa options for Chinese wanting to live and work in Australia. The options above are just some of the main ones. To discuss your personal context and all your visa options, contact a registered Australian immigration agent at Migration Ways. We have a main office in the Melbourne CBD and also conduct Skype visa consultations.

Travel Serenely in our experienced hands.

Read the recent Migration Ways newsletter about the latest immigration, visa and citizenship news.

One way for young Chinese to work and live in Australia is via a Working Holiday visa
Many Chinese Tourists Enjoy Australia’s Beautiful Beaches
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